marxmail.org

The Art Gallery

Home Subscribe Archives Links Words of struggle Facts about the system Frequently Asked Questions

Click on any image below to get full-sized version

Mike Alewitz

Mike Alewitz, a Marxism list subscriber, is America's most respected muralist working in the left-wing traditions of Ben Shahn and Diego Rivera. The banner shown here was done for Mexican trade unionists. Mike is the director of the LaBOR aRT MURaL ProJECT, which proposes: "The primary purpose ... is to organize cultural activities that support union and working class struggles for social and economic justice in New Jersey, nationally and internationally." For a review of "Insurgent Images: the Agitprop Murals of Mike Alewitz", click here


 

Tony "The Bricklayer" Perniciaro

Tony "The Bricklayer" Perniciaro is a working-class Sicilian-American  in his seventies. His work consists of poems and water colors that depict the life of working-class Americans, including the construction workers and bricklayers he knew all his life. Here is a sample of his art and poetry, from his book "Tony the Bricklayer" (Delacorte Press):

brickies
with sweated shirts
topping out a luxury flat—
foreman yelling down the shaft—
"hey, you clam diggers,
shoot up some more stones
till we reach the sky."


Alfredo Ceibal

"El Té" was painted by Alfredo Ceibal, one of Guatemala's most acclaimed artists, whose "magical realist" style evokes both the mystery and suffering of his native land. Alfredo resides in NYC, where he became acquainted with Louis Proyect, who has collected his work since the late 1980s.


Richard Shelton

Richard Shelton has been painting for four decades now and uses the human figure to "express his observations about the world and times in which we live," according to a catalog for the show at Los Angeles's Frumkin/Duval Gallery (closes Feb. 19, '00). By blurring the background in the The "Invisible Man,"  Shelton raises question about the absence of spiritual values in the hurried business world.


Daniel Marlin

The sewing machine has appeared in the paintings and collages of Daniel Marlin for 25 years. It is for him highly evocative of personal and collective stories. He earns his keep in Berkeley, California raising money over the phone for peace, social justice and environmental NGO's. Maybe you've heard from him.